disable


Fedora GNU/Linux: Disable/Stop or Enable/Start Bluetooth service

There was this Fedora box for which we were asked to disable most of the methods it had available for communicating with the outside world.
One of the features of the box that we decided to block was its Bluetooth device.
To make our life easy, and since the users would not have admin rights, we decided to simply stop and disable the Bluetooth service on the box and be over with it!

The way we stopped and disabled the Bluetooth service was with the following two devices.

#Stop Bluetooth service that is currently executing
systemctl stop bluetooth;
#Prevent Bluetooth service from starting after a reboot
systemctl disable bluetooth;

Once you disable the service and stop it, you will notice that on the GUI of the Gnome settings application it still shows the basic menu for the Bluetooth device.
That should not worry you though because if you enter the Bluetooth configuration tab you will notice that the user will not be able to turn the device on and make use of it.

Revert changes and re-enable / re-start the Bluetooth service:

In order to restore the Bluetooth service back to normal (to enable it and start it), just execute the following two commands:

#Start the Bluetooth service right now
systemctl start bluetooth;
#Make sure that Bluetooth service will start after each system restart
systemctl enable bluetooth;


Anonabox Pro – Disable Wi-Fi

The following video demonstrates how to disable the Wi-Fi on an  Anonabox Pro.

  1. Connect to the device via the LAN Ethernet port.
    It has a build DHCP server by default so you do not need to configure the IP.
    After you get connected, go to the default location of the device interface, which is http://192.168.19.84:1776/.
  2. After the interface loads, enter the root password and click on the Login button.
    (if you are using a brand new Anonabox or a box that was recently flashed then click on the Login button without entering a password (if you enter one, it will be ignored)).
  3. Then, go to the top menu Network and select the option Wireless
  4. At the new page, under the category Wireless Overview click on the Disable button.
  5. Finally, click on the OK button when you get the Really shut down network? confirmation box and wait for the changes to get applied, the image with the Wi-Fi logo will change to one that has a red stamp on it and right under the SSID field you will get the message Wireless is disabled or not associated.

To enable the WiFi, just repeat the steps above and click on the Enable button.


Ubuntu: install / start/stop enable/disable ssh server

OpenSSH is a freely available version of the Secure Shell (SSH) protocol family of tools for remotely controlling, or transferring files between, computers.

Install SSH server

To install the openssh-server on an Ubuntu, you need execute the following command as root or using sudo:

apt-get install openssh-server -y;

Disable SSH server

To disable the ssh service, execute the following command as root or using sudo:

systemctl disable ssh;

Enable SSH server

To enable the ssh service, execute the following command as root or using sudo:

systemctl enable ssh;

Stop SSH server

To stop (or deactivate) the ssh service, execute the following command as root or using sudo:

systemctl stop ssh;

Start SSH server

To start (or activate) the ssh service, execute the following command as root or using sudo:

systemctl start ssh;

Status of SSH server

To check the status of the ssh service, execute the following command as root or using sudo:

systemctl status ssh;

CONCEPTS

In a nutshell:

  • enabled is a service that is configured to start when the system boots
  • disabled is a service that is configured to not start when the system boots
  • active is a service that is currently running
  • inactive is a service that is currently stopped and may be disabled, but it can be started and become active

In much more detail:

systemd provides a dependency system between various entities called “units” of 12 different types. Units encapsulate various objects that are relevant for system boot-up and maintenance. The majority of units are configured in unit configuration files, whose syntax and basic set of options is described in systemd.unit(5), however some are created automatically from other configuration, dynamically from system state or programmatically at runtime. Units may be “active” (meaning started, bound, plugged in, …, depending on the unit type, see below), or “inactive” (meaning stopped, unbound, unplugged, …), as well as in the process of being activated or deactivated, i.e. between the two states (these states are called “activating”, “deactivating”). A special “failed” state is available as well, which is very similar to “inactive” and is entered when the service failed in some way (process returned error code on exit, or crashed, or an operation timed out). If this state is entered, the cause will be logged, for later reference. Note that the various unit types may have a number of additional substates, which are mapped to the five generalized unit states described here.
— From man systemd