Daily Archives: 21 April 2016


NotePad++: Remove multi-line (/**/) comments automatically 3

We are going to use NotePad++ replace functionality (CTRL+H) to remove all multi-line comments that are enclosed in a pair of /* and */.

While in the source file you want to edit, open up the ‘Replace’ window either from the ‘Search’ menu or by using CTRL+H.

Set ‘Search Mode’ to ‘Regular expression’ and tick the ‘. matches newline’.

In the ‘Find what:’ input type /\*(.*?)\*/\n and leave the ‘Replace with:’ input empty.

NotePad++ Remove Multi-Line CommentsTo find the next comment, you can click the ‘Find Next’ button and then hit ‘Replace’.

To make the change on all comments just hit ‘Replace All’.

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Fedora/Bash: Get the IP of enp0s3

Following is a small snippet that will print on screen the IP of enp0s3 (or any other device if you change the name) while in Fedora.
As you will see, it is not a very sound solution as it depends on the structure of the output of ifconfig enp0s3.

Nevertheless is works (for Fedora at least)! 🙂

ifconfig enp0s3 | grep "inet " | sed -e 's/^[[:space:]]*//' -e 's/[[:space:]]*$//' | cut -d ' ' -f 2

What this line does is: first it prints out the configuration information for enp0s3, then finds the line that contains the inet, then using sed it will trim the result (in other words, it will remove all leading and all trailing white-space from the pipe), finally cut gets the second column of the data after separating the line using the space symbol.

The Fedora version that was used for this tutorial is

$cat /etc/fedora-release 
Fedora release 23 (Twenty Three)

The version of ifconfig for this tutorial is

$ifconfig --version
net-tools 2.10-alpha

In case you want to assign the IP of enp0s3 to a variable, you can easily do as follows

IP=`ifconfig enp0s3 | grep "inet " | sed -e 's/^[[:space:]]*//' -e 's/[[:space:]]*$//' | cut -d ' ' -f 2`;

Ubuntu/Bash: Get the IP of eth0

Following is a small snippet that will print on screen the IP of eth0 while in Ubuntu (Both server and desktop versions).
As you will see, it is not a very sound solution as it depends on the structure of the output of ifconfig eth0.

Nevertheless is works (for Ubuntu at least)! 🙂

ifconfig eth0 | grep "inet addr" | cut -d ':' -f 2 | cut -d ' ' -f 1

What this line does is: first it prints out the configuration information for eth0, then finds the line that contains the inet addr, using cut it gets the second column of the data after separating the line using the : symbol. Right now in the pipe we will have something similar to this 192.168.1.37 Bcast, so we need to filter out the last part as well. We do the last filtering by using cut again, this time by getting the first column while using the space character as the delimiter.

The Ubuntu version that was used for this tutorial is

$lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID:	Ubuntu
Description:	Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS
Release:	14.04
Codename:	trusty

The version of ifconfig for this tutorial is

$ifconfig --version
net-tools 1.60
ifconfig 1.42 (2001-04-13)

In case you want to assign the IP of eth0 to a variable, you can easily do as follows

ETH0=`ifconfig eth0 | grep "inet addr" | cut -d ':' -f 2 | cut -d ' ' -f 1`;