C++


CentOS 7: C++: static linking cannot find -lstdc++ -lm and -lc

Recently, we were trying to compile a C++ application with the following compilation command on a CentOS 7 64bit :

g++ -static -O2 -lm -Wall -Wno-unused-result -std=c++11 -DCS_ACADEMY -DONLINE_JUDGE 510152025.cpp -o 510152025;

unfortunately, we got the following errors:

 /usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lstdc++
 /usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lm
 /usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lc
 collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

To resolve the issues, we performed the following installations to install the static versions of the glibc and libstdc libraries:

sudo yum install glibc-static libstdc++-static -y;

 


C/C++: Get a random number that is in a specific range

Assuming you need to generate a random number that is in a specified range, you can do the following:

//int rand(void) creates a pseudo-random number in the range of 0 to RAND_MAX
//RAND_MAX is defined in stdlib.h and is the largest number rand will return (same as INT_MAX).
const int new_number = (rand() % (maximum_number + 1 - minimum_number)) + minimum_number;

The above code first creates a pseudo-random number that is in the range of [0, RAND_MAX].
Then it will divide it with the width (+1) of the range we want to use (maximum_number + 1 - minimum_number) and get the remainder (modulo).
The modulo will be in the range of [0, maximum_number - minimum_number], so we add to it the value of minimum_number to shift the result to the proper range.
This solution, as demonstrated in the example below, works for negative ranges as well.

Full example of generating 100000 random numbers that are all in the range [-31, 32].

const int maximum_number = 31;
const int minimum_number = -32;
unsigned int i;
for (i = 0; i <= 100000; i++) {
	const int new_number = (rand() % (maximum_number + 1 - minimum_number)) + minimum_number;
	printf("%d\n", new_number);
}

C/C++: Comparing the performance of syslog vs printf

The following code tries to compare the performance of syslog() with the printf() command. printf_vs_syslog.c (compressed) (159 downloads)
On our machine, it appears that syslog() is faster than printf().

To be as fair as possible, when the application was executing, we were monitoring the system logs as well, so that they will be printed on screen.
On CentOS 7, you can see the syslog in the file /var/log/messages.
The command we used was: sudo tail -f /var/log/messages

Results:

printf: Seconds elapsed 0.480000
syslog: Seconds elapsed 0.180000

Full source code for test:

printf_vs_syslog.c (compressed) (159 downloads)
#include <stdio.h>
#include <syslog.h>
// #include <stdlib.h> is needed for the resolution of EXIT_SUCCESS
#include <stdlib.h>
// #include <time.h> is needed for the clock() function and the macro CLOCKS_PER_SEC
#include <time.h>
// #include <unistd.h> and #include <sys/types.h> are needed for the functions uid_t getuid(void); and uid_t geteuid(void);
//getuid() returns the real user ID of the calling process.
//geteuid() returns the effective user ID of the calling process.
//These functions are always successful.
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

#define RANGE (100000)

int main()
{
    {
        const clock_t start = clock();

        unsigned int i;
        for (i = 0; i < RANGE; i++){
            printf ("Program started by Real User %u (Effective User %u)\n", getuid(), geteuid());
        }
        printf("\n");

        const clock_t end = clock();
        const float seconds = (float) (end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
        printf("printf: Seconds elapsed %f\n", seconds);
    }
    {
        const clock_t start = clock();

        setlogmask (LOG_UPTO (LOG_NOTICE));
        openlog ("bytefreaks", LOG_CONS | LOG_PID | LOG_NDELAY, LOG_LOCAL1);
        unsigned int i;
        for (i = 0; i < RANGE; i++){
            syslog (LOG_NOTICE, "Program started by Real User %u (Effective User %u)", getuid(), geteuid());
        }
        closelog ();

        const clock_t end = clock();
        const float seconds = (float) (end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
        printf("syslog: Seconds elapsed %f\n", seconds);

    }
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}


printf_vs_syslog.c (compressed) (159 downloads)

C/C++: Set and Get the name of a pthread

Naming a pthread using meaningful names, can be a very useful feature for debugging multi-threaded applications as it can make your logs very informative.
For this reason, we are presenting two examples demonstrating the use of names in pthreads.

Example 1: The pthread decides for its name

The following code, creates a pthread which later, it will give itself a meaningful name.

pthread_self_named.c (compressed) (29 downloads)
// #define _GNU_SOURCE is needed for the resolution of the following warnings
//warning: implicit declaration of function ‘pthread_setname_np’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
//warning: implicit declaration of function ‘pthread_getname_np’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <asm/errno.h>
#include <errno.h>
// #include <stdlib.h> is needed for the resolution of EXIT_SUCCESS
#include <stdlib.h>

//The thread name is a meaningful C language string, whose length is restricted to 16 characters, including the terminating null byte.
#define MAX_LENGTH_PTHREAD_NAME (16)

struct thread_info_t
{
    // Used to identify a thread.
    pthread_t thread_id;
};

// This is the thread that will be called by pthread_create() and it will be executed by the new thread.
void *self_named_thread(void *data)
{
    // We know that the input data pointer is pointing to a thread_info_t so we are casting it to the right type.
    struct thread_info_t *thread_info = (struct thread_info_t *) data;

    const int setname_rv = pthread_setname_np(thread_info->thread_id, "Tom Hanks");
    if (setname_rv)
    {
        errno = setname_rv;
        perror("Could not set pthread name");
    }

    char thread_name[MAX_LENGTH_PTHREAD_NAME];
    const int getname_rv = pthread_getname_np(thread_info->thread_id, thread_name, MAX_LENGTH_PTHREAD_NAME);
    if (getname_rv)
    {
        errno = getname_rv;
        perror("Could not get pthread name");
    }
    //This function always succeeds, returning the calling thread's ID.
    const pthread_t tid = pthread_self();
    //Usually pthread_t is defined as follows:
    //typedef unsigned long int pthread_t;
    //so we print pthread_t as an unsigned long int
    fprintf(stdout, "I am thread with ID '%lu', my name is '%s' and I gave me my name by myself\n", tid, thread_name );

    return NULL;
}

int main()
{
    struct thread_info_t thread_info;

    const int create_rv = pthread_create(&(thread_info.thread_id), NULL, &self_named_thread, (void *) &thread_info);
    if (create_rv)
    {
        errno = create_rv;
        perror("Could not create thread");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    // The pthread_join() function suspends execution of the calling thread until the target thread terminates, unless the target thread has already terminated.
    const int join_rv = pthread_join(thread_info.thread_id, NULL);
    if (join_rv)
    {
        errno = create_rv;
        perror("Could not join thread");
    }
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

pthread_self_named.c (compressed) (29 downloads)

Example 2: The parent decides for the pthread name

The next code, creates a pthread and the parent gives the thread a meaningful name.

pthread_named_by_parent.c (compressed) (31 downloads)
// #define _GNU_SOURCE is needed for the resolution of the following warnings
//warning: implicit declaration of function ‘pthread_setname_np’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
//warning: implicit declaration of function ‘pthread_getname_np’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <asm/errno.h>
#include <errno.h>
// #include <stdlib.h> is needed for the resolution of EXIT_SUCCESS
#include <stdlib.h>
// #include <unistd.h> is needed for the resolution of unsigned int sleep(unsigned int seconds);
#include <unistd.h>

//The thread name is a meaningful C language string, whose length is restricted to 16 characters, including the terminating null byte.
#define MAX_LENGTH_PTHREAD_NAME (16)

struct thread_info_t
{
    // Used to identify a thread.
    pthread_t thread_id;
};

// This is the thread that will be called by pthread_create() and it will be executed by the new thread.
void *self_named_thread(void *data)
{
    // We know that the input data pointer is pointing to a thread_info_t so we are casting it to the right type.
    struct thread_info_t *thread_info = (struct thread_info_t *) data;

    //Added an artificial delay for the sake of the example.
    //Making sure the parent thread gave the pthread a name.
    sleep(1);

    char thread_name[MAX_LENGTH_PTHREAD_NAME];
    const int getname_rv = pthread_getname_np(thread_info->thread_id, thread_name, MAX_LENGTH_PTHREAD_NAME);
    if (getname_rv)
    {
        errno = getname_rv;
        perror("Could not get pthread name");
    }
    //This function always succeeds, returning the calling thread's ID.
    const pthread_t tid = pthread_self();
    //Usually pthread_t is defined as follows:
    //typedef unsigned long int pthread_t;
    //so we print pthread_t as an unsigned long int
    fprintf(stdout, "I am thread with ID '%lu', my name is '%s' and my parent gave me my name\n", tid, thread_name );

    return NULL;
}

int main()
{
    struct thread_info_t thread_info;

    const int create_rv = pthread_create(&(thread_info.thread_id), NULL, &self_named_thread, (void *) &thread_info);
    if (create_rv)
    {
        errno = create_rv;
        perror("Could not create thread");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    const int setname_rv = pthread_setname_np(thread_info.thread_id, "Bob Marley");
    if (setname_rv)
    {
        errno = setname_rv;
        perror("Could not set pthread name");
    }

    // The pthread_join() function suspends execution of the calling thread until the target thread terminates, unless the target thread has already terminated.
    const int join_rv = pthread_join(thread_info.thread_id, NULL);
    if (join_rv)
    {
        errno = create_rv;
        perror("Could not join thread");
    }
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

pthread_named_by_parent.c (compressed) (31 downloads)

C/C++: Change position of bytes 1 and 2 with bytes 3 and 4 in a 32bit unsigned integer

The following function will produce a new 32bit value where bytes 1 and 2 were moved in place of bytes 3 and 4 and vice versa.

reorder-bytes.c (compressed) (102 downloads)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

const unsigned int move_bytes_1_2_after_4 (const unsigned int input) {
  //We get the two leftmost bytes and move them to the positions of the two rightmost bytes.
  const unsigned int first_two_bytes = (input >> 16) & 0x0000FFFF;
  //We get the two rightmost bytes and move them to the positions of the two leftmost bytes.
  const unsigned int last_two_bytes = (input << 16) & 0xFFFF0000;
  //We combine the two temporary values together to produce the new 32bit value where bytes 1 and 2 were moved in place of bytes 3 and 4 and vice versa.
  return (first_two_bytes | last_two_bytes);
}

int main(void) {
  const unsigned int value = 0xABCD0123;
  printf ("Original: 0x%08x\n", value);
  const unsigned int modified = move_bytes_1_2_after_4(value);
  printf ("Modified: 0x%08x\n", modified);
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Executing the above code will produce the following output:

Original: 0xabcd0123
Modified: 0x0123abcd

reorder-bytes.c (compressed) (102 downloads)


C++: How to print an unsigned character (unsigned byte – uint8_t) using cout

When you try to print an unsigned 8-bit (1 byteuint8_t) integer through cout, you will notice that instead of getting the arithmetic value of the variable on the output, you will get its character representation of the ASCII table. This issue occurs due to the fact that there is no data type for unsigned 8-bit integer in C++ and the uint8_t is nothing more than a typedef of the unsigned char data type. When cout tries to print the uint8_t it will call the ostream& operator<< (ostream& os, unsigned char c); which will insert the character representation of the character variable c to the os.

Below we propose a few methods to resolve this issue.

Method A: Convert the variable to an unsigned int before printing it

The following example will convert the value of the variable to an unsigned int before printing it so that cout will call the ostream& operator<< (unsigned int val); and it will print it as a number.

//For unsigned characters
cout << unsigned(c) << endl;
//For signed characters
cout << int(c) << endl;

Method B: Static cast the variable to an unsigned int before printing it

The following example will use static_cast to cast the value of the variable to an unsigned int before printing it so that cout will call the ostream& operator<< (unsigned int val); and it will print it as a number.

//For unsigned characters
cout << static_cast<unsigned int>(c) << endl;
//For signed characters
cout << static_cast<int>(c) << endl;

Method C: Cast the variable to an unsigned int before printing it

The following example will cast the value of the variable to an unsigned int before printing it so that cout will call the ostream& operator<< (unsigned int val); and it will print it as a number.

//For unsigned characters
cout << (unsigned int) c << endl;
//For signed characters
cout << (int) c << endl;

Method D: Add a unary + operator before the variable to create an arithmetic operation that does not affect the value and print its result

The following example will add a unary + operator before the variable so that it will produce an arithmetic result and print that one so that cout will treat the result as a number.

cout << +c << endl;

Method E: Use Argument-dependent name lookup (ADL)

Argument-dependent name lookup, applies to the lookup of an unqualified function name depending on the types of the arguments given to the function call.
Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argument-dependent_name_lookup

In the following example we change the behavior of cout using a custom namespace to achieve the goal of printing and char as an 8-bit integer.
Specifically, we overload the inline std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &os, const char c); for cases where we the variable is not defined to be signed or not, to check if the input char variable is signed or unsigned and then perform a static_cast to the proper type.
Also, inline std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &os, const signed char c); and inline std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &os, const unsigned char c); are also overloaded to perform the correct static_cast immediately when the the type of the variable is known.

#include <iostream>

namespace bytes {
    inline std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &os, const char c) {
        return os << (std::is_signed<char>::value
                ? static_cast<int>(c)
                : static_cast<unsigned int>(c));
    }

    inline std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &os, const signed char c) {
        return os << static_cast<int>(c);
    }

    inline std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &os, const unsigned char c) {
        return os << static_cast<unsigned int>(c);
    }
}

using namespace std;

int main() {

    const uint8_t c = 64;

    {
        using namespace bytes;
        cout << c << endl;
    }
    {
        cout << c << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}


C++ How to make cout not use scientific notation

To force cout to print numbers exactly as they are and prevent it from using the scientific notation, we can use the std::fixed I/O manipulator as follows

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    std::cout << "The number 0.0001 in fixed:      " << std::fixed << 0.0001 << endl
              << "The number 0.0001 in default:    " << std::defaultfloat << 0.0001 << endl;

    std::cout << "The number 1000000000.0 in fixed:      " << std::fixed << 1000000000.0 << endl
              << "The number 1000000000.0 in default:    " << std::defaultfloat << 1000000000.0 << endl;
return 0;
}

Output

The number 0.0001 in fixed:      0.000100
The number 0.0001 in default:    0.0001
The number 1000000000.0 in fixed:      1000000000.000000
The number 1000000000.0 in default:    1e+09

C++: Simplified version of ‘Friends with benefits’ demonstrating friend classes

A friend class in C++ can access the private and protected members of the class in which it is declared as a friend.

Friendship may allow a class to be better encapsulated by granting per-class access to parts of its API that would otherwise have to be public.[2] This increased encapsulation comes at the cost of tighter coupling due to interdependency between the classes.

Properties

  • Friendships are not symmetric – if class A is a friend of class B, class B is not automatically a friend of class A.
  • Friendships are not transitive – if class A is a friend of class B, and class B is a friend of class C, class A is not automatically a friend of class C.
  • Friendships are not inherited – if class Base is a friend of class X, subclass Derived is not automatically a friend of class X; and if class X is a friend of class Base, class X is not automatically a friend of subclass Derived.

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friend_class

In the following example we assign both the Man to be a friend of the Woman and the Woman to be a friend of the Man in order to allow both parties to access the private members of the other.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Man;

class Woman {
  friend class Man;

public:
  void touch(Man man);
private:
  void * body;
};

class Man {
  friend class Woman;

public:
  void touch(Woman woman);
private:
  void * body;
};

void Woman::touch(Man man) {
  void * other = man.body;
}

void Man::touch(Woman woman) {
  void * other = woman.body;
}

int main() {
  Man man;
  Woman woman;

  man.touch(woman);
  woman.touch(man);
  return 0;
}